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AHDB publishes nutrition guides to support marketing and ‘end misconceptions’ of red meat
15/01/2018 - 07:00
New guidance on the health benefits of eating beef, lamb and pork has been compiled to help the food industry better and more accurately market red meat.

The Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) has compiled what it says is legally compliment, factual information which can be used by retailers and producers to aid promotion, as well as by nutritionists and dieticians for medical purposes.

The organisation worked with trading standards officials in Buckinghamshire and Surrey to get over 70 messages on nutrition approved.

Three separate Nutrition and Health Claim Regulations guides have been published and are now available online.

Laura Ryan, AHDB senior strategy director for Beef & Lamb, said: “Our own market research shows that health is becoming a more prominent driver for consumers when purchasing food, but the consumption of beef, lamb and pork, as part of a healthy balanced diet, is often challenged and undermined by negative misconceptions.

“With the release of the guides the AHDB aims to demonstrate how red meat can be accurately promoted to consumers, using scientifically substantiated nutrition and health claims, expressed in a clear, consumer-friendly language.

“We hope that retailers, processors and producers alike will use the guides to help shout about all the nutritional benefits beef, lamb and pork brings to a balanced diet.”

The work is part of AHDB’s strategy to positively influence and modify consumer understanding and behaviour towards beef, lamb and pork in a healthy and balanced diet.

“Certain immediately recognisable nutritional messaging resonates more with some groups than others, so it is likely that the selection of the claims used may be influenced by the target audience of a particular promotional campaign,” added Ryan.

“For example, older people were found to be more interested in eyesight, bone health and mental function. Those with children were more interested in bone health, protein and immunity support.”